TIME TO FLIP SOME TABLES


(Source: memewhore)


yo-i-think-i-better-go:

TEAM LADS!


thegreenwolf:

In the Wake of Martha’s Passing - by Lupa Greenwolf

One hundred years ago today [Sept. 1], a small, lonesome little bird passed away at the Cincinnati Zoo. A few decades before this would have been a death of no note; there had been millions of her sort darkening the skies in impossibly large flocks. But on September 1, 1914, Martha, the very last passenger pigeon, died quietly in her cage.

How did a species that was so numerous less than fifty years before just disappear from the face of the planet? Two factors seem to have been the culprits: habitat loss from human expansion, and overhunting for passenger pigeon meat sold commercially. Indeed, these malignant twin forces have caused the endangerment and extinction of countless species over the centuries as human population has exploded, and the demand for land and other resources has grown accordingly.

Birds in the Victorian era faced an additional threat: demand for their feathers. Feathered hats had become exceedingly popular; individual plumes, whole wings, and even entire bird skins were slapped onto millinery confections and sold at a profit. The plume trade became a goldmine, and a feather hunter could retire on the skins of a few particular species. Some species suffered more than others; the great egret almost went extinct because they only grew their magnificent (and much-desired) plumage during the breeding season. Killing an egret almost certainly meant the death of its young, since both parents were needed to incubate the eggs and care for the young once hatched, and this had a predictably detrimental effect on their ability to recover from the impact of rigorous hunting.

Yet we still have egrets today; populations have rebounded, and they’re listed as of “least concern” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Why?

Read the rest here at Paths Through the Forests.

thegreenwolf:

In the Wake of Martha’s Passing - by Lupa Greenwolf

One hundred years ago today [Sept. 1], a small, lonesome little bird passed away at the Cincinnati Zoo. A few decades before this would have been a death of no note; there had been millions of her sort darkening the skies in impossibly large flocks. But on September 1, 1914, Martha, the very last passenger pigeon, died quietly in her cage.

How did a species that was so numerous less than fifty years before just disappear from the face of the planet? Two factors seem to have been the culprits: habitat loss from human expansion, and overhunting for passenger pigeon meat sold commercially. Indeed, these malignant twin forces have caused the endangerment and extinction of countless species over the centuries as human population has exploded, and the demand for land and other resources has grown accordingly.

Birds in the Victorian era faced an additional threat: demand for their feathers. Feathered hats had become exceedingly popular; individual plumes, whole wings, and even entire bird skins were slapped onto millinery confections and sold at a profit. The plume trade became a goldmine, and a feather hunter could retire on the skins of a few particular species. Some species suffered more than others; the great egret almost went extinct because they only grew their magnificent (and much-desired) plumage during the breeding season. Killing an egret almost certainly meant the death of its young, since both parents were needed to incubate the eggs and care for the young once hatched, and this had a predictably detrimental effect on their ability to recover from the impact of rigorous hunting.

Yet we still have egrets today; populations have rebounded, and they’re listed as of “least concern” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Why?

Read the rest here at Paths Through the Forests.


jean-huh-kirschnickerdoodle:

bluesigma:

rynnay:

Just an easy trick I learned a few years ago that I thought I’d share. May not work 100% all the time, but works well for simple hand/arm placement.

MY FACE LITERALLY DROPPED THIS IS FUCKING PERFECT

image


venatorphile-art:

Bonnie listens to one of Cr1tikal’s stories. (x)


strawberryjizzbomb:

fake-suicide-of-genius:

theyearoftherequiem:

frenums: 

skeleton smartypants was defeated once and for all

THE REACTION FACES JUST MAKE THIS 84927 TIMES FUNNIER

This is my kind of humor


angelasthings:

kaijugroupiee:

Okay so I think Chris Evans was saying in an interview about how it’s always the children who discover the hero in disguise, and I just realized why: it’s because they’re short enough to see under the hat and they’re innocent and hopeful enough to still believe in heroes.

it’s because they’re short enough to see under the hat

(Source: jackkgilinsky)


cakeman265:

"Do you drive?"

"Yeah."

image

"No, a real car."

"Yeah."

image


jaclcfrost:

limbozoneguardian:

jaclcfrost:

characters doing the thing where they shield other characters from harm with their own body physically hurts me

I imagine it physically hurts them too.

don’t


itscolossal:

A Brain-Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show


(Source: teflonly)



When the gods send you a blessing, you don’t ask why it was sent.

When the gods send you a blessing, you don’t ask why it was sent.

(Source: khalees)


ianoshea:

getinthefuckingjaeger:

nostopdasgay:

catslock:

condelimoncio:

 MY WHOLE LIFE IS A LIE

THAT’S CHEATING

This is a blatant violation of trust

YOU LYING FUCKS I SPENT MY WHOLE LIFE ADMIRING THE BRICK LAYERS THAT ALWAYS LAY THE BRICKS NEAT AND PERFECTLY LINED UP HOLY SHIT I LOOK UP TO YOU HOW COULD YOU


I FEEL LIKE SOMEONE JUST TOLD ME SANTA CLAUSE ISNT REAL ALL OVER AGAIN

ianoshea:

getinthefuckingjaeger:

nostopdasgay:

catslock:

condelimoncio:

 MY WHOLE LIFE IS A LIE

THAT’S CHEATING

This is a blatant violation of trust

YOU LYING FUCKS I SPENT MY WHOLE LIFE ADMIRING THE BRICK LAYERS THAT ALWAYS LAY THE BRICKS NEAT AND PERFECTLY LINED UP HOLY SHIT I LOOK UP TO YOU HOW COULD YOU

I FEEL LIKE SOMEONE JUST TOLD ME SANTA CLAUSE ISNT REAL ALL OVER AGAIN

(Source: terror4o4)


dashingyounghero:

hipsterinatardis:

Don’t leak nudes

Leak pictures of SPIDER-MAN

image


shewalksthelilacwoods:

litphonix:

2nd of September 1973, J. R. R. Tolkien, author of The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion, died at the age of 81.

His wife, Edith Tolkien died two years earlier and Tolkien had the name Lúthien engraved on her tombstone at Wolvercote Cemetery, Oxford. When Tolkien died 21 months later he was buried in the same grave, with Beren added to his name. The engravings read:

Edith Mary Tolkien
Lúthien
1889–1971
John Ronald
Reuel Tolkien
Beren
1892–1973

In Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium, Lúthien was the most beautiful of all the Children of Ilúvatar, and forsook her immortality for her love of the mortal warrior Beren. After Beren was captured by the forces of the Dark Lord Morgoth, Lúthien rode to his rescue upon the talking wolfhound Huan. Ultimately, when Beren was slain in battle against the demonic wolf Carcharoth, Lúthien, like Orpheus, approached the Valar, the angelic order of beings placed in charge of the world by Eru (God), and persuaded them to restore her beloved to life.

Fun fact: Samwise was based off of Edith as well since she was always supporting Tolkien with her positivity and love after he came back traumatized by the trenches in WWI. And Sam was named after their dog.